Programs

English

Students studying

Read, Write, Think, Lead.

The English department at Cottey College offers courses in writing, literature, rhetoric, and critical theory.  We believe that the careful study of language and literature is not only at the heart of a liberal arts education, but also is crucial to becoming  broadly-educated, multi-faceted human beings.

Doing English

Doing English at Cottey involves a wide variety of experiences such as the following:

  • engage in critical, meaningful discussions in and out of the classroom;
  • travel to readings by well-known writers;
  • explore notable literary sites;
  • participate in such academic organizations as Sigma Tau Delta and Sigma Kappa Delta;
  • attend and present papers at national conferences;
  • submit papers to Cottey’s academic writing contest;
  • edit and publish in Cottey’s literary magazine or yearbook;
  • participate in internships and service learning projects;
  • discover who you are, what you think, and what you are capable of achieving.

Travel Opportunities

Cottey offers a wide range of travel opportunities for English majors:

  • Excursions

An especially exciting component of our program, these excursion courses are typically short-term interdisciplinary classes that culminate in travel to a literary destination. Some of our past offerings include Willa Cather’s Childhood Home and Memorial Prairie in Nebraska, The World War I Museum in Kansas City, Mark Twain’s home in Hannibal, Missouri, and Jane Austen’s home in Chawton, England.

  • English Honor Society Conventions

Students have the opportunity to submit proposals to present papers at the joint annual convention of Sigma Tau Delta and Sigma Kappa Delta, the honor societies for baccalaureate- and associate-level English majors. At this convention, students, meet with professional writers, network with over a thousand English students from around the country, and compete for prizes for their work. In fact, a Cottey English major recently won an award for the “Best Sigma Kappa Delta Paper at the Convention”!

  • National Conferences
  • Course Field Trips

Students travel locally and regionally for experiential learning opportunities related to their classes. For example, students in a recent course on travel writing visited sites both close to campus and in Kansas City to develop their observation and written presentation skills.

  • Study Abroad

Cottey provides English majors with opportunities to study abroad in all corners of the world like New Zealand, South Korea, England, and even a Semester-at-Sea.

Internships

In addition, students have the opportunity to pursue or develop internships in areas of individual interest. Past internships include

  • -Nevada Daily Mail
  • -Cottey Writing Center Intern
  • -Research intern
  • -Writer for Autostraddle.com
  • -Intern for the Serenbetz Institute
  • -Intern for an online travel website
  • -Intern as an assistant at the local middle school
  • -Intern as an event planner

Customize Your Experience

At Cottey, students who pursue the Bachelor of Arts degree in English can choose between two rigorous, broad-based concentrations: (a) the Women Writers emphasis , and (b) the traditional English major.  Our signature program, the women writers track, provides a unique educational experience that prepares students to enter graduate school, pursue a professional degree (e.g. law), or explore the world of work. The women writers track enables students to understand what it means to be a woman and how women writers have critiqued and rewritten oppressive cultural conceptions of women. On the traditional English track, students explore the history, theory, and place of literature and language in the English-speaking world, and are challenged by courses in English literature, American literature, Shakespeare, transatlantic literature, cultural studies, and critical theory. Both tracks cultivate in students the habits of mind and the practical skills required to navigate our complex, diverse world and to create positive social change.

The Write Stuff

We believe that learning to write well is about much more than just correcting essays.  Through sustained writing, inquiry, and revision, students develop the complex forms of awareness, habits of thought, and rhetorical responsiveness that are essential for any global citizen in the 21st century.

The minor in Writing and Rhetoric combines the sustained study of the foundations of Western thought with the contemporary importance of writing for diverse audiences and media.  Open to all students regardless of either major or degree program, the minor includes courses on creative writing, environmental writing, advanced writing, the history of rhetoric, business and technical writing, writing for the professions/disciplines, and much more.  In addition to their coursework, students pursuing a minor in Writing and Rhetoric will also develop a professional portfolio of their work composed of both traditional and new media texts.

The Merry Ann DeVaney Sauls Academic Writing Contest

Capstone Experience

Unlike student s at many other colleges and universities, Cottey English majors are required to complete a capstone research project focused on a topic of their choosing. Students work with 2 faculty members on the thesis and present their project to the campus community. A list of English Capstone Projects from past years is featured below:

2017:

Hannah Cook:  “The Mystery of John Jasper and Lieutenant Tartar:  Understanding a Murderer
and Pulling a Hero from Obscurity”

Christina Litherland: “Double-Speak: The Literary Language of Phillis Wheatley and
Gwendolyn Brooks”

Talia Robinson: “Religion and Agency in Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God

Shelby Weitz: “Artistic Process as Female Empowerment within Willa Cather’s The Song of the Lark and Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse

2016:

Caitlin Lanzavecchia: “The Struggle for a Feminist Fairy Tale: Anne Sexton’s Transformations
Poems”

Abby Pino: “Identity, Culture, and Historical Trauma in American Indian Literature”

Lauren Stephens: “A Cold Reading: A.S. Byatt, Constructing Binary Oppositions, and
Subverting the Fairy Tale Canon”

2015:

Chelsea Mahlum, “Doppelgängers of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and ‘The Raven’”

Paige Ott, “Setting, the Imagination, and Objectification in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie

2014:

Kathryn Hoover, “An End to Housekeeping: The American Myth versus American
Women”

Kourtney Walker, “’Howl’: Defying Hegemony”

Aimee Young, “Gender and the Sublime in the Gothic Novel: The Mysteries of Udolpho

2013:

Lacey Shea Carpenter, “The Narrative of the Life without Patriarchy: Frederick Douglass’s
Identity Formation as It Relates to the Transgender Experience”

Sarah Chase, “The Rise in the Commodification of Women in Christina Rossetti’s ‘Goblin
Market’”

Jennifer Leverette, “The Impact of Culture on the Literary Vampire from Dracula to Twilight

Devin Napoli, “The Construction of Morrison’s Kyriarchy in The Bluest Eye

Sunshine Seitz, “The Dark: A Reclamation and Celebration of the Feminine”

Sarah Stones, “Inspiration and Leadership in T.H. White’s The Once and Future King

 

English Honor Societies

Sigma Kappa Delta: Founded at Cottey College in 1996 by Professor Emeritus of English Dr. Don Perkins and colleagues at other institutions, Cottey’s Alpha Chapter of Sigma Kappa Delta is the national organization’s first chapter.This two-year English honorary society publishes Cottey’s campus literary magazine, The Image Tree, sponsors speakers and events for the campus, and develops and participates in events that raise awareness of, and interest in, the field of English. For more information, please visit www.english2.org.

Sigma Tau Delta: Sigma Tau Delta, the international English honor society, was founded in 1924 and has over 900 active chapters around the world. Cottey’s Alpha Chi Theta chapter was chartered in 2016. In addition to a wide range of on-campus activities, Sigma Tau Delta members are eligible to apply for Sigma Tau Delta scholarships, participate in international conventions, and submit original work for publication and writing awards. For more information, please visit www.english.org.

Faculty Advising

Preparing a class schedule and investigating majors can be confusing for a first-year student.  At Cottey, each English major is assigned a full-time English professor as an academic advisor to assist individual students in clarifying and achieving their educational goals. This personalized approach to student advising allows the student to take ownership of her own academic success, while utilizing the experience and expertise of our faculty.

For more information contact:
Enrollment Management
Phone: 1-888-5-COTTEY
E-mail: admit@cottey.edu

The Writing Minor at Cottey is designed to give students the strategies and flexible practices to successfully communicate in a variety of writing situations. Many of our students are interested in writing, editing, and teaching; however, a Writing Minor is a powerful addition to any major at Cottey. Writing is not just for English majors; it’s necessary for communicating within academic settings, the professional world, and the public sphere.

The Writing Minor prepares students to become reflective and articulate communicators, capable of meeting the expectations of writing in their professional lives. Students will develop the rhetorical understanding necessary to navigate questions of purpose, audience, context, and genre that arise across many contexts.

Students in the Writing Minor will work individually and collaboratively on writing projects across a number of genres for a variety of audiences.

For a list of Courses, our Faculty, and an outline of the Minor, please see the Writing Minor page.

 

ENG 103 Introduction to Literature (f)
Examines fiction, poetry, and/or drama from a variety of perspectives. Covers components, devices, and vocabulary that characterize various literary genres. 3 credits

ENG 200 Introduction to the English Major (xf)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Introduces students to the discipline of English. Considers issues in the profession of English, and career options for English majors. Introduces students to academic journals, literary criticism, and literary theory. 3 credits

ENG 201 English Literature 1 (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Study of works by selected British writers who represent significant literary movements up to Romantic period. Includes some writing about British literature. 3 credits

ENG 202 English Literature 2 (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Study of works by selected British writers who represent significant literary movements from Romantic period to present. Includes some writing about British literature. 3 credits

ENG 205 American Literature 1 (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Study of works by selected American writers who represent significant literary movements up to the Civil War. Includes some writing about American literature. 3 credits

ENG 206 American Literature 2 (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Study of works by selected American writers who represent significant literary movements after the Civil War to present. Includes some writing about American literature. 3 credits

ENG 211 Excursions (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Faculty-led excursions enable students to “experience and do English” so they may understand issues in a more sophisticated and critical way. Excursions require a minimum of 15 hours of academic commitment in and out of the classroom per credit hour. Topics vary. 1-2 credits

ENG 215 Shakespeare (xs)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
In-depth study of selected plays and poems, with some consideration of historical and critical conexts. Includes some writing about Shakespeare’s work. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 220 American Women Writers (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Introduces students to American women writers in traditional and nontraditional genres. Focuses on the way women explore or subvert gender. Includes writing about women and literature. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 222 British Women Writers (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
Introduces students to British women writers from the 17th century to the present. Focuses on obstacles faced by British women writers and the way women historically have explored or subverted gender. Includes writing about women and literature. 3 credits

ENG 230 Studies in Ethnic Literature (y)
Prerequisite: WRI 102, ENG 103, or permission of instructor
The content of this course varies, consisting of selected works of ethnic groups within or outside the United States. Includes consideration of the historical and cultural contexts in which the literature is produced. 3 credits

ENG 231 Studies in Ethnic Literature: AfricanAmerican Literature (y)
This course will survey the history of African-American Literature from the eighteenth century to the present. We will read a wide range of literary texts, as well as cultural and political documents. In analyzing these works, we will also consider art and music, literary and critical theory, and social responsibility. 3 credits

ENG 232 Studies in Ethnic Literature: Ethnic Women Writers (y)
This course will focus on ethnic literature by women writers in the U.S. and abroad. We will read a number of novels; however, we will also consider stories, poems, and theoretical essays. In addition, we will discuss issues of women’s leadership, social responsibilty, and global awareness. 3 credits

ENG 290 English Grammar and Usage (xf)
This course will provide a review of the basics of grammar and mechanics for the purpose of knowing and explaining how English grammar and language works. Students will learn the Reed-Kellogg system of diagramming to understand the deep structure of language. Grammar will be presented from both a prescriptive and descriptive perspective. Ideal for students interested in language and writing, studying a foreign language, or wanting to teach English or a foreign language. 3 credits

ENG 308 Young Adult Literature (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course introduces students to Young Adult Literature in a variety of genres. Includes discussion of various pedagogical methods for response-based teaching and issues in literary censorship. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 310 Women in Shakespeare (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course stresses the plays where women play prominent roles, wield political power, or strongly determine the play’s outcome. Some writing about Shakespeare required. Fulfills pre-1900 BA English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 312 History of the English Language (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course investigates the three phases of the English language – Old, Middle, and Modern English – and the relation of language to history and culture. 3 credits

ENG 320 Topics in Fiction (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course focuses on an in-depth study of the novel from a thematic, generic, or developmental perspective. Topics vary. Close reading, active discussion, and researched analysis will be central to the class. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 321 Topics in Fiction: Eighteenth-Century British Women Writers (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This class surveys the novels of a variety of British women writing during the long 18th century. Works will be studied in context and, where applicable, in dialogue with one another and with other fiction of the time. Also examines select works of literary criticism and excerpts from contemporaneous nonfiction. Fulfills pre-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 322 Topics in Fiction – Future Women: Science Fiction by American Women (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course covers science fiction by American women from 1900 to the present. Emphasizes genre, gender issues, and theoretical models of science fiction. Some writing required. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 323 The Modern Global Novel (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course covers diverse novels since 1900 that encourage global awareness. Some readings will be translations of novelists who published work in foreign languages. Some writing on the global novel required. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 324 On Location: British Women Writers at Home (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course explores how a writer’s environment shapes literary output. Texts covered include novels, theoretical essays, and literary criticism. In addition to classes on campus throughout the semester, students travel to England to visit the homes, hometowns, or other relevant sites closely linked to various British women novelists. In addition, the class promotes strategies of sustainable tourism such as public transportation, use of local hotels/ bed and breakfasts, etc. Fulfills pre-1900 B.A. English requirement and excursion requirements. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 325 Topics in Fiction: The Transgender Novel (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course covers transgender themes, characters, and sexualities. Students will consider transgender theory and a wide range of literary texts and films. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 330 Topics in Poetry (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
Thematic, stylistic, or period study of poetry. Topics vary. 3 credits

ENG 331 Topics in Poetry: Victorian Poetry (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
Survey of British poetry written during the Victorian period, covering authors such as Tennyson, the Brownings, Christina Rossetti, and Thomas Hardy. Explores the cultural, political, and social milieus of the time in order to gain a deeper understanding of the many themes and stylistic innovations of the period. Fulfills pre-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 332 Topics in Poetry: The Greening of American Poetry: 1945 to Present (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course will explore the attention post-World War II American poets gave to nature, renewal of habitats, and poetic perceptions of planetary wholeness. The rise of ecopoetics and writing as activism will be considered. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 333 Topics in Women’s Poetry: “Her Kind”: Twentieth-Century American Women Poets (Gwendolyn Brooks, Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, Sylvia Plath) (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course will explore the poetry of four important midtwentieth-century American women poets: Gwendolyn Brooks, Anne Sexton, Adrienne Rich, and Sylvia Plath. We will employ close readings of their work, feminist literary theory, and interdisciplinary approaches to understand their position in literary history, their response to American culture, and their “revisioning” (to use Adrienne Rich’s term) of women’s experience. Special attention will be given to women’s leadership and social responsibility. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 350 Topics in Pre-1900 Literature (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
Thematic, stylistic, or period study of poetry, narrative (fiction or nonfiction), or drama. Topics vary. 3 credits

ENG 351 Topics in Pre-1900 Literature: The Gothic Revival (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course covers Gothicism as a literary movement, mode, and ideology. Traditional and contemporary theories related to the Gothic will be included, and drive research projects. Fulfills pre-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 352 Topics in Pre-1900 Literature: American Realism and Naturalism (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
Course will consider American literature written between the Civil War and World War I. The class will analyze its literary, historical, cultural, social, and theoretical contexts, and special attention will be given to gender, race, class, and sexuality. Fulfills pre-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 360 Topics in Post-1900 Literature (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
Thematic, generic, stylistic, or period study of post-1900 literature. Topics vary. 3 credits

ENG 363 Topics in Post-1900 Literature: World War I (y)
Prerequisites: ENG 103, second-year standing, OR permission of instructor
World War I marked a pivotal moment in world history as technology and industrialization led to the first large-scale use of heavy artillery and other weapons of mass destruction. In this course, we will trace these developments and their effects on the human psyche. Readings include poetry, novels, journals, letters, and other nonfiction. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 364 Topics in Post–1900 Literature: “Make it New!’: Women and Literary Modernism (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course surveys the wide range of Modernist literature that responds to the social, artistic, technological, intellectual, and economic changes that took place in the early 20th century. Students will use literary theory and criticism, as well as other cultural artifacts, to understand the ways in which writers make sense of their rapidly changing world. Special attention will be given to women’s leadership, social responsibility, and global awareness. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 370 Major Authors (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
In-depth study of a single author or a pair of authors. Topics vary. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 371 Major Authors: Jane Austen (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
Class will explore the development of Jane Austen’s literary career through a focus on her six major novels and some of the juvenilia. Background information on Austen’s life and times will enable students to appreciate the many themes and subtexts of these works. Fulfills pre-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG/WGS 372 Major Authors: Toni Morrison (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
Exploration of the development of Toni Morrison’s literary career, focusing primarily on her novels and criticism. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG/IDS 380 Interdisciplinary Topics in Literature (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course focuses on the ways in which English can work with other disciplines to gain a better understanding of literature and the world. Topics vary. 3 credits

ENG/IDS 382 “Where the Truth Lies”: Mad Men, Gender, and the American Dream (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 103, any 200-level ENG course (except ENG 290), or permission of instructor
This course will consider the award-winning AMC series Mad Men from a variety of perspectives. We will examine the cultural and historical context of the show, analyze key scenes, and discuss topics such as advertising, identity, nostalgia, design, fashion, visual style, race, class, gender, and sexuality. Fulfills post-1900 B.A. English requirement. 3 credits

ENG 410 Critical Theory (y)
Prerequisite: ENG 200, second-year standing, OR permission of the instructor
Provides a historical and thematic survey of critical theory and an interdisciplinary theoretical framework for the analysis and understanding of literature and the world beyond the text. 3 credits ENG 490 Capstone Research Project (s) Prerequisite: Open only to senior English majors. Culmination of the student’s work in the major. Allows student to complete a thesis under the direction of an English faculty member. Class meetings will guide and support the thesis writing process by creating regular writing workshops for students and allowing for various kinds of feedback during each stage of the process. Students will also develop résumés, application letters, and portfolios, and they will present their theses to the campus community. 3 credits

 


First-Year Writing Seminar

English B.A. Plan: Women Writers Focus

Year 1 Fall Spring
First Year Writing Seminar 3 College Writing 3
MAT 103 3 ART 101 3
Foreign Language 4 Foreign Language 4
ENG103 3 PHI 112 3
CSC 101 3 WGS105 3
Total: 16 Total: 16
Year 2 Fall Spring
ENG 200 3 ENG 211 1
ENG 202 3 ENG/WST 220 3
ENG 210 3 PSY 101 3
SPA 201 4 SPA202 3
Lab Science (BIO 120) 3 SPE 101 3
Dance 1 P.H.E. 1
Total: 17 Total: 14
Year 3 Fall Spring
ENG 211 1 ENG 199 1
ENG/WST 3xx (pre-1900) 3 ENG/WST 3xx (post-1900) 3
ENG/IDS 380 (post-1900) 3 WRI 390 3
HIS 330 3 PHI 305 3
WGS 350 3 ANT 291 3
Elective 3  Elective  3
Total: 16 Total: 16
Year 4 Fall Spring
ENG 410 3 ENG 490 3
Electives 12 Electives 9
Total: 15 Total: 12
Total Hours: 122

English B.A. Plan: General Focus

Year 1 Fall Spring
First Year Writing Seminar 3 College Writing 3
MAT 103 3 ART 101 3
Foreign Language 4 Foreign Language 4
ENG103 3 PHI 112 3
CSC 101 3 Elective 3
Total: 16 Total: 16
Year 2 Fall Spring
ENG 200 3 ENG 211 1
ENG 202 3 ENG/WST 220 3
WGS 105 3 PSY 101 3
SPA 201 4 SPA 202 3
Lab Science (BIO 120) 3 SPE 101 3
Dance 1 P.H. E. 1
Total: 17 Total: 14
Year 3 Fall Spring
ENG 211 1 ENG 199 1
ENG 3xx (pre-1900) 3 ENG 3xx (post-1900) 3
ENG/IDS 380 (post-1900) 3 WRI 390 3
HIS 330 3 PHI 305 3
Elective 3 Electives 6
ANT 291 3
Total: 16 Total: 16
Year 4 Fall Spring
ENG 410 3 ENG 490 3
ENG 3xx 3 Electives 9
Electives 9
Total: 15 Total: 12
Total Hours: 122

The English faculty is dedicated to offering you excellence in instruction.  Small class sizes enable an uncommon level of personal attention in first-year writing as well as in advanced classes.  Faculty members promote student research, sponsor student organizations and trips, and keep up with current scholarship and academic trends.  You can follow the English department on Facebook, too.

Trisha Stubblefield, Ph.D.
Professor of English
Program Coordinator Department of English
131 Rubie Burton Academic Center
417-667-6333, ext. 2274
tstubblefield@cottey.edu

Kathryn Pivak, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
132 Rubie Burton Academic Center
417-667-6333, ext. 2272
kpivak@cottey.edu

Melody Denny, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
Writing Center Director
137 Rubie Burton Academic Center
417-667-6333, ext. 2245
mdenny@cottey.edu

Mary Laughlin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
138 Rubie Burton Academic Center
417-667-6333, ext. 2183
mlaughlin@cottey.edu

English @ Cottey

Our English majors and Writing minors have opportunities to attend and present at national conferences, both their own research and research with faculty mentors.

In October 2017, English and Education majors attended the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing (NCPTW) at Hofstra University on Long Island.

Sophomore Macey Holland presented her original research on international students in the Writing Center.

Students Alison (Alex) Brown, Malikah Fard-Allah, Macey Holland, and Laurel Loyless enjoying their time on the Hofstra campus.

In October 2016, English majors Christina Litherland and Malikah Fard-Allah attended the International Writing Centers Association (IWCA) Conference in Denver.

Christina presented her original research focused on writing center visits at Cottey. Malikah presented with Dr. Melody Denny on a supplemental writing studio program.  

What our Students are Saying

“The ‘Cottey Advantage’ of smaller class sizes and approachable professors really helped me feel more comfortable.”

“You are immediately required to think for yourself and come to your own conclusions about literature rather than simply rephrasing what you found in an article somewhere.”

“I have constantly felt that others…educated elsewhere did not have the same quality of education in … English.”

“I loved getting to know everyone in my classes, and some of my best friendships were born in the English Department.”

“I was able to take what I learned at Cottey with me to my transfer school, and was praised for my polished work. I loved getting to know everyone in my classes. Cottey English classes actually aim to teach excellence and style, whereas other English departments in larger schools barely enforce proper grammar and MLA rules.

“[Cottey] makes you want to be someone important.”

“At Cottey, right away you are told that your ideas are valid and worth discussing”

English majors read, discuss, and write about literature, including poetry, prose, and drama. Works may also be drawn from film, journalism, and television, and classes explore the critical, historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts of these works. In addition, you practice your own analysis and writing while developing your language-use and composition skills.

Is This Major For You?

You might like this major if you also like reading, writing, discussion, languages, film, music, theatre, dance, and working independently.

Consider this major if you are good at attention to detail, critical reading/thinking, research, writing, persuading, active learning.

Employment Settings

  • Colleges and universities
  • Forensic labs and hospitals
  • Government and non-profit agencies
  • Libraries and historical societies
  • Corporations or consulting firms
  • Public and private research groups

Sample Occupations

  • Associate Editor
  • Writer/Editor/Reporter/Journalist
  • Technical Writer/Editor
  • Public Information Specialist
  • Human Resources
  • Sports Writer
  • Advertising Writer
  • Insurance Underwriter
  • Leadership Consultant
  • Grant Writer
  • Paralegal
  • Researcher
  • Teacher

Academic Assistance Center Resources

Opportunities in Writing Careers
100 Jobs in Words
Opportunities in Technical Writing Careers
Opportunities in Journalism Careers

Typical Courses In This Major

  • College Writing
  • Creative Writing
  • American Literature
  • British Literature
  • Shakespeare
  • Poetry
  • Critical Theory

Other Majors You Might Like

  • Women’s Studies
  • Communications
  • Classics
  • Drama and Theatre
  • History
  • Journalism

Websites To Visit

The Association for Writers and Writing Programs
www.awpwriter.org

The Society for Technical Communication
www.stc.org

National Writers Union
www.nwu.org

Association of American Publishers
www.publishers.org

For more information on this and other majors, visit the Transfer and Career Planning Office located in the Academic Assistance Center, RBAC 164, ext. 2132.