Programs

Music

Music Professor

All Cottey students are welcome in music classes including ensembles, elective lessons, music appreciation, and fundamentals of music courses. Music Scholarships are available for any qualified student who participates in lessons and ensembles.

The Music Department’s mission is to successfully prepare students to transfer into baccalaureate music programs nationwide and to provide a music enrichment program for all Cottey students.


A Cottey music student:

  • Develops basic skills and understanding of harmony, melody, rhythm, form, and texture
  • Develops ability to read music at sight and other technical skills sufficient for demonstrating aesthetic expression
  • Develops skills as listener, performer, composer, and scholar through interpretation, composition, analysis, and criticism of music
  • Develops performance skills in various styles of music
  • Develops musicianship through ensemble performance each semester

The Music Department Handbook includes important information about the program, as well as health and safety information for all students. Access the Cottey Music Department Handbook here.

Access the Schedule of events here.

The Cottey Music Department has been a vital force in the life of Cottey students since the College’s founding in 1884. As an accredited member institution of the National Association of Schools of Music (N.A.S.M.) since 1956, Cottey’s Music Department meets national N.A.S.M. standards for educational quality and institutional integrity. Cottey’s Music faculty are accomplished in their fields, and passionate about sharing music with the Cottey students and beyond.

Cottey’s Associate in Arts-Music (A.A.M.) degree prepares students to continue in baccalaureate programs in music education, music performance, composition, music therapy, music theory, and musicology. The A.A.M. degree focuses on the first two years of liberal arts coursework needed for a baccalaureate degree in music, including music theory coursework, lessons, and ensembles.

The Music Department is housed in the new Judy and Glenn Rogers Fine Arts Building, which includes state of the art practice rooms, classrooms, and rehearsal spaces. On-campus performances are held in the Haidee and Allen Wild Center For the Arts, which includes a 490 seat auditorium, a 150 seat recital hall, and the P.E.O. Foundation Art Gallery.

Alumnae of the Cottey Music Department have pursued careers in music education at the secondary and collegiate level, performance and other related fields. Current students can participate in large and small ensembles, as well as solo performances.

MUS 101 Music Appreciation (fs)
This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music. 3 credits

MUS 103 Fundamentals of Music (fs)
A study of music theory fundamentals (scales, key signatures, meter signatures, intervals, triads, and rhythmic notation), aural skills fundamentals (ear-training and sight singing), and keyboard fundamentals (scales, intervals, and triads). May be taken by music majors as a required prerequisite for the MUS 111 Harmony I, MUS 109 Keyboard Harmony I, and MUS 110 Aural Skills I sequence. (May not be taken for credit by students who have earned credit for Harmony I-IV or Aural Skills I-IV.) Open to all other students for elective credit. 3 credits

MUS 108 Popular Music in the U.S. (y)
Surveys American popular music from 1840 to present, as well as related musical styles that influenced its development. Emphasizes listening skills, historical awareness, and critical thinking. 3 credits

MUS 109 Keyboard Harmony I (f)
Pre- or Co-requisite: MUS 111 Harmony I
Major and natural minor scales, cadence progressions, reading lead sheet symbols, harmonizing melodies, beginning transposition, and introduction to reading figured basses. 1 credit

MUS 110 Aural Skills I (f)
Pre- or Co-requisite: MUS 111 Harmony I
Beginning interval recognition, melodic dictation, rhythmic dictation, harmonic dictation, sight singing, and rhythmic reading. Some computer-assisted instruction. 1 credit

MUS 111 Harmony I (f)
Prerequisite: Placement Exam OR MUS 103 Fundamentals of Music
Intended for prospective music majors, but open to all qualified students with consent of the instructor. Review of music fundamentals, introduction to figured bass, analysis, melody writing, and elementary part-writing. Introduction to the Sibelius notation program and computer-assisted instruction. 3 credits

MUS 112 Harmony II (s)
Prerequisite: MUS 111 Harmony I
Continued study of musical composition through part-writing and analysis. Includes triads in inversions, non-chord tones, seventh chords, and secondary functions. Continued use of the Sibelius notation program. 3 credits

MUS 113 Keyboard Harmony II (s)
Prerequisite: MUS 109 Keyboard Harmony I
Harmonic and melodic minor scales, more advanced melody harmonization, and reading of lead sheets. Continued transposition, harmonic progressions, figured basses, and introduction to improvisation. 1 credit

MUS 114 Aural Skills II (s)
Prerequisite: MUS 110 Aural Skills I
More advanced melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation. Continued study of sight singing utilizing C clefs, and more advanced rhythmic reading. Continued use of computer-assisted instruction. 1 credit

MUS 119 Beginning Class Piano (fs)
This course is taught in a classroom/piano laboratory environment, and is intended for those who have NO keyboard background. Students who previously have formally studied piano should enroll in a higher-level course. Theory covered in this class includes finger numbers, note reading, rhythm, dynamics, legato/staccato, key signatures, intervals, and rests. 1 credit

MUS 120 Elective Lessons 1-2 credits (fs)
Prerequisite: Placement Interview
Corequisite: MUS 270
MUS 120 B Elective Brass
MUS 120 C Elective Percussion
MUS 120 P Elective Piano
MUS 120 S Elective Strings
MUS 120 V Elective Voice
MUS 120 W Elective Woodwinds

MUS 121 Applied Lessons 1-3 credits (f)
Prerequisite: Placement Interview
Corequisite: MUS 270
MUS 121 B Applied Brass
MUS 121 C Applied Percussion
MUS 121 P Applied Piano
MUS 121 V Applied Voice
MUS 121 W Applied Woodwinds

MUS 122 Applied Lessons 1-3 credits (s)
Prerequisite: Placement Interview
Corequisite: MUS 270
MUS 122 B Applied Brass
MUS 122 C Applied Percussion
MUS 122 P Applied Piano
MUS 122 V Applied Voice
MUS 122 W Applied Woodwinds

MUS 209 Keyboard Harmony III (f)
Prerequisite: MUS 113 Keyboard Harmony II
More advanced level melody harmonization, reading lead sheets, transposition, harmonic progressions, improvisation, and reading figured basses. Introduces score reading at the keyboard. 1 credit

MUS 210 Aural Skills III (f)
Prerequisite: MUS 114 Aural Skills II
Melodic dictation with chromaticism, harmonic dictation with seventh chords, all interval dictation, and sight singing with chromaticism. Some computer-assisted instruction. 1 credit

MUS 211 Harmony III (f)
Prerequisite: MUS 112 Harmony II
Continued study of musical composition through part-writing and analysis. Includes study of secondary functions and modulation. Emphasis on instrumental writing and further use of the Sibelius notation program. 3 credits

MUS 212 Harmony IV (s)
Prerequisite: MUS 211 Harmony III
Continued study of chromatic harmony through part-writing and analysis. Includes study of late nineteenth and twentieth century analytical and compositional techniques. Continued use of the Sibelius notation program. 3 credits

MUS 213 Keyboard Harmony IV (s)
Prequisite: MUS 209 Keyboard Harmony III
Advanced melody harmonization, reading lead sheets, improvisation, reading figured basses and score reading with transposed instrumental parts and with parts that use C clefs. 1 credit

MUS 214 Aural Skills IV (s)
Prerequisite: MUS 210 Aural Skills III
Advanced level melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation. Harmonic dictation with chromaticism and modulations. Advanced sight singing with chromaticism and modulations. Some computer-assisted instruction. 1 credit

MUS 221 Applied Lessons 1–3 credits (f)
Prerequisite: Audition
Corequisite: MUS 270
MUS 221 B Applied Brass
MUS 221 C Applied Percussion
MUS 221 P Applied Piano
MUS 221 V Applied Voice
MUS 221 W Applied Woodwinds

MUS 221 R Recital (1 credit)
MUS 222 Applied Lessons 1–3 credits (s)
Prerequisite: Audition
Corequisite: MUS 270
MUS 222 B Applied Brass
MUS 222 C Applied Percussion
MUS 222 P Applied Piano
MUS 222 V Applied Voice
MUS 222 W Applied Woodwinds

MUS 222 R Recital (1 credit)

MUS 230 Basic Conducting
An introduction to techniques of conducting, including basic patterns, gestures, error detection, elementary score study, and transpositions. 2 credits

MUS 270 Repertoire Class 0 credit (fs)

MUS 270B Brass Repertoire Class
Corequisite: Elective or Applied Brass Lessons

MUS 270C Percussion Repertoire Class
Corequisite: Elective or Applied Percussion Lessons

MUS 270P Piano Repertoire Class
Corequisite: Elective or Applied Piano Lessons

MUS 270S String Repertoire Class
Corequisite: Elective String Lessons

MUS 270V Voice Repertoire Class
Corequisite: Elective or Applied Voice Lessons

MUS 270W Woodwind Repertoire Class
Corequisite: Elective or Applied Woodwind Lessons

MUS 285 Wind Ensemble (fs)
Prerequisite: Audition
Performance of standard and contemporary concert band music literature. Ensemble performs several times. 1 credit

MUS 287 Chamber Singers (fs)
Prerequisite: Audition
A women’s vocal ensemble dedicated to the study, rehearsal, and performance of a variety of choral literature specializing in music by and about women. 1 credit

MUS 289 Jazz Ensemble (fs)
Prerequisite: Audition
Ensemble performs a variety of styles, including jazz, rock and roll, blues, Latin, and R&B. Does not meet the ensemble requirement for the music major or minor. 1 credit

MUS 291 Women in Music (y)
Increased awareness of the contributions of women to the creation and performance of music. Fulfills both Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (WGS) and Fine Arts requirements. 3 credits.


For more information on Cottey’s academic program, please contact the Office of Enrollment Management by email or by calling 1-888-5-COTTEY (1-888-526-8839).

Sample Schedule for AA Music Degree

Year 1 Fall Spring
Harmony I 3 Harmony II 3
Keyboard Harmony I 1 Keyboard Harmony II 1
Aural Skills I 1 Aural Skills II 1
Applied Lessons in primary instrument 2 Applied Lessons in primary instrument 2
Repertoire Class 0 Repertoire Class 0
Ensemble 1 Ensemble 1
First Year Writing Seminar 3 College Writing 3
Dance/PE Requirement 1 Humanities Requirement 3
College Algebra or higher 3 Science plus Lab Requirement 4
Total: 15 Total: 18
Year 2 Fall Spring
Harmony III 3 Harmony IV 3
Keyboard Harmony III 1 Keyboard Harmony IV 1
Aural Skills III 1 Aural Skills IV 1
Applied Lessons in primary instrument 2 Applied Lessons in primary instrument 2
Repertoire Class 0 Repertoire Class 0
Ensemble 1 Ensemble 1
Dance/PE Requirement 1 Music Survey Course 3
Social Science Requirement 3 Additional Requirements 4
Additional Requirements 4
Total: 16 Total: 15

One of the above courses should be selected to also meet the Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies requirement of the General Education Core. Otherwise, one additional course will be required.

Contact Us




Theresa Spencer, M.F.A.
Professor of Music
Voice Lessons and Chamber Singers
305 Rogers Fine Arts Building
(417) 667-8181, ext. 2283
tspencer@cottey.edu

Amanda Cook, D.M.
Assistant Professor of Music
Music Department Coordinator
Music Theory Courses and Woodwind Lessons
309 Rogers Fine Arts Building
(417) 667-8181, ext 2285
acook@cottey.edu

Jackie Lordo, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Music
Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Brass Lessons, and Music Theory
308 Rogers Fine Arts Building
(417) 667-8181, ext 2199
jlordo@cottey.edu

Gary Johnson, M.M.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music
Percussion Lessons
317 Rogers Fine Arts Building
(417) 667-8181, ext. 2255
gjohnson@cottey.edu

Peggy Graves, M.M.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music
Piano Lessons
306 Rogers Fine Arts Building
(417) 667-8181 ext. 2266
pgraves@cottey.edu

Keith Stanfield
Adjunct Assistant Instructor of Music
String Lessons
316 Rogers Fine Arts Building
(417) 667-8181, ext. 2185
kstanfield@cottey.edu

The Associate in Arts-Music degree is a two-year program that prepares students to continue in baccalaureate programs in music education, music performance, composition, music therapy, music theory, and musicology. The A.A. Music degree focuses on the first two years of liberal arts coursework needed for a baccalaureate degree in music, including music theory coursework, lessons, and ensembles. Music majors take 31-35 credit hours of music classes, along with 8 credits of additional requirements and a general education core, for a total of 62-65 credit hours.

Each semester, music majors enroll in an Ensemble and Applied Lessons. Students have an individual lesson and also participate in a weekly Repertoire Class as a group. Music majors also take Harmony, Sight Singing & Ear Training, and Keyboard Harmony classes each semester. Harmony classes teach the written music theory skills needed to analyze and compose music. Sight Singing & Ear Training classes teach students to recognize and notate what they hear, and sing using solfege syllables at sight. Keyboard Harmony classes teach functional piano skills and techniques, such as scales, chord progressions, harmonization, and transposition at the keyboard. Music majors also take one music survey course, such as Women in Music, Music Appreciation, or Popular American Music.

Minor in Music

The Music Minor is a 21-credit hour program for students who are majoring in areas other than music, but want to continue to study music at the college level. Music minors enroll in an Ensemble and Applied Lesson each semester. Students have an individual lesson and participate in a weekly Repertoire Class as a group. Music minors also take two semesters of music theory courses. In the first year, students study Harmony, developing the written music theory skills needed to analyze and compose music. In the second year, students study Sight Singing & Ear Training, learning to recognize and notate what they hear, and sing using solfege syllables at sight. Music minors also take Keyboard Harmony classes for two semesters, learning functional piano skills and techniques, such as scales, chord progressions, harmonization, and transposition at the keyboard. Music minors also take one music survey course, such as Women in Music, Music Appreciation, or Popular American Music.

Much of the music coursework for music majors and music minors is the same. The primary difference is that music majors take four semesters of each music theory class, while music minors take two semesters of each. Music minors take fewer music theory classes each semester, allowing room for courses in the student’s major field. In addition, music majors are recommended to take two credit hours of lessons each semester, increasing their practice time and raising their musical performance ability.

Minor in Music

Applied Lessons (4 credit hours)

MUS 121 Applied Lessons MUS 221 Applied Lessons
MUS 122 Applied Lessons MUS 222 Applied Lessons

Lessons must be in the same instrument.

Lessons must include MUS 270 Repertoire Class (0 credit hour class) as a co-requisite.

Students with MUS 120 Elective Lesson credit should speak with the Music Department Coordinator, Professor Spencer, about this requirement.

Lessons are usually taken for 1 credit hour per semester, but may be taken for 2 credit hours with instructor permission. Students should attend the Music Department Placement Interviews or speak with a music teacher to enroll in lessons.

Ensemble (4 credit hours)

Choose from:

MUS 285 Wind Ensemble MUS 287 Chamber Singers

The same ensemble may be repeated for credit.

Music Theory (10 credit hours)

MUS 109 Elementary Keyboard Harmony (Fall)
MUS 110 Elementary Ear Training and Sight Singing (Fall)
MUS 111 Harmony I (Fall)
MUS 112 Harmony II (Spring)
MUS 113 Keyboard Harmony II (Spring)
MUS 114 Ear Training and Sight Singing (Spring)

Students must take the Music Theory Placement Exam in order to enroll in these courses. Music Fundamentals (MUS 103) may be needed in preparation.

Music minors can take Harmony I (Fall) and Harmony II (Spring) first, and then the other music theory classes the following year, or enroll in all three types of classes together (MUS 109, 110, 111), which will complete the music theory classes in one year.

Music Survey Course (3 credit hours)

Choose from:

MUS 101 Music Appreciation MUS 291 Women in Music
MUS 108 Popular Music in the U. S.

Please note that these courses are not offered every semester.

Chamber Singers

Chamber Singers are a select group of women who sing in a variety of styles, with an emphasis on 20th and 21st century women composers.

Wind Ensemble

Wind Ensemble is open to all Cottey students with experience playing in a concert band setting. This concert band performs from all genres of the traditional concert band literature.

Jazz Ensemble

Jazz Ensemble performs blues, swing, jazz, funk and more. This group enjoys the flexibility of improvisation based music, and performs regularly each semester.

Other groups

Each semester various chamber ensembles are formed based on student interest. For example, brass quartet, woodwind quintet, piano duo, etc.

Interested in joining an ensemble? Contact the Music Department.

Music is a competitive field. Students interested in pursuing a music degree should be committed to practicing and self-improvement. Musicians learn to collaborate with others, perform under pressure, and express themselves creatively. They study music from a variety of perspectives: the historical development of music, ear training and musicianship, the organization and theory of music, composition, performance instruction, and music education. Music students at Cottey can participate in a variety of ensembles and receive scholarships.

Career Opportunities:

A wide variety of careers are available to the well-trained music major. Teachers at the primary and secondary levels are filled by music education majors. Advanced degrees are required for faculty positions at the college level, with opportunities in several areas, including performance, music theory, music history, composition, music education and research. Music majors might become conductors, professional orchestra or choir members, chamber musicians, or soloists. Students with interests in psychology and sociology frequently pursue studies in music therapy. Musicians also work as arrangers, church musicians, music publishers, music librarians, sound engineers, sales representatives, and instrument repair technicians. Music is an active and ever-changing field, with numerous possible careers.

  • Employment Settings
  • Schools
  • Churches
  • Professional bands, choirs, and orchestras
  • Hospitals and Nursing Homes
  • Recording Studios
  • Music Publishers
  • Music-related Businesses
  • Sample Occupations
  • Elementary or Secondary Music Teacher
  • Performer
  • Private Music Instructor
  • College Professor
  • Music Therapist
  • Music Historian
  • Sound Engineer

Music scholarships are available to all qualified students, regardless of academic major. Prospective students must first be accepted for admission to Cottey College, and submit a music scholarship application. Next, prospective students must audition for the music faculty.

  • Prospective students may interview and audition with a Music Department Faculty member during a campus visit. Prospective students who visit when classes are in session may meet current students and experience a Cottey ensemble rehearsal.
  • Prospective students who are not able to visit campus in person can submit a CD, DVD, or online link of a high quality recording.

Audition materials may include: contest-type solos, etudes, or All-District/Region audition music. Vocalists should sing with accompaniment, if possible. If you are having trouble selecting music, please ask your high school director or music teacher. Or, contact our Music Department Faculty (music@cottey.edu). Each scholarship application is processed soon after all materials are received. The priority deadline for scholarship consideration is February 1. Later applications will be considered until funding is exhausted.

Scholarship Requirements

Recipients of the scholarship for music majors/ minors must enroll in the harmony block of classes (5 credit hours), private lessons in your primary instrument (1-2 credit hours), and a Cottey music ensemble (1 credit hour) each semester.

Recipients of the scholarship for non-music majors must enroll in a private lesson and a Cottey music ensemble each semester.

Students selected for a music major scholarship and a scholarship in another discipline will be asked to choose between the two disciplines because it is difficult for a student to complete the requirements for two scholarships if carrying a music major load.