Health Services

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Student health services are provided in the Student Life Center on the second floor of Hinkhouse Center. Local physicians under contract with the College provide treatment for minor illnesses and injuries, health counseling and referral services. The student health office manager assists the physician during Health Services and is available to assist students with their medical needs including referral, insurance questions, prescriptions, and transportation.

Health Services hours are posted in each residence hall. Students needing to see a doctor should arrive at the Health Services office within the first 15 minutes of the scheduled clinic time. The physicians may leave in thirty minutes if they have seen everyone needing their professional services. If in doubt, contact the student health office manager at ext. 2157 to see if the physician is still available. Health Service hours are subject to last minute change or cancellation due to emergency situations beyond the control of the physicians.
Student Health and Immunization Form
Satisfaction Postcard

Required for Cottey:

Tuberculosis Screening for All Foreign Born Students:

All foreign born students are required to have a chest x-ray within one month of entering Cottey with the report on file in Health Services before your arrival. Students that received a BCG vaccine or Bacillus Calmette-Guérin as an infant (usually international students, the vaccination is not used in the United States) are also required to have a QuantiFERON blood draw administered. The QuantiFERON blood draw is a specialized test administered to aid in the detection of tuberculosis. Because QuantiFERON does not interact with the BAC vaccine, it gives an accurate indication of the presence of tuberculosis germs in the body. A positive QuantiFERON test and a negative chest x-ray indicates latent tuberculosis infection and preventative medication therapy (e.g., INH) is required. The QuantiFERON blood draw is scheduled during Welcome Week at Cottey, and the fee is applied to your Business Office statement.

If you have a positive chest x-ray then:

Medical treatment for active tuberculosis is required, and then approval from the vice president for student life is required to attend Cottey. Documentation must be submitted to Health Services, including physician’s notes, lab work, chest x-ray report, negative sputum test, and clearance to attend college.
*BA program, international students returning to Cottey after study abroad are required to have a chest x-ray within one month of your return to Cottey and are scheduled for the QuantiFERON blood draw during Welcome Week at Cottey.

Tuberculosis Screening for Domestic Students:

All domestic students are required to have a tuberculin skin test within the past six months before your arrival at Cottey. Please send a copy of documentation to Health Services.

If you have a positive skin test and a negative chest x-ray then:

Begin the preventative medication therapy (e.g., INH) for latent tuberculosis and submit documentation to Health Services.

If you have a positive skin test and a positive chest x-ray then:

Medical treatment for active tuberculosis is required, then approval from the vice president for student life is required to attend Cottey. Documentation must be submitted to Health Services, including physician’s notes, lab work, chest x-ray report, negative sputum test, and clearance to attend college.

A previous positive skin test and/or precious tuberculosis treatment requires documentation of medication therapy, a current negative chest x-ray, and/or negative sputum test sent to Cottey College Health Services.
*BA program, domestic students returning to Cottey after study abroad are required to have a tuberculin skin test within one month of your arrival at Cottey.

Tuberculosis Information

What is TB?

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is spread from person to person through the air. TB usually affects the lungs, but it can also affect other parts of the body, such as the brain, the kidneys, or the spine.

How is TB Spread?

When a person with infectious TB coughs or sneezes, droplets of the bacteria are expelled into the air. If another person inhales air containing these droplets, he or she may become infected.

However, not everyone infected with TB bacteria becomes sick. TB is NOT spread by dishes, drinking glasses, clothing, or touching a person with the disease. As a result, two TB-related conditions exist: latent TB infection and active TB disease.

What Are the Symptoms of TB?

The general symptoms of TB disease or active tuberculosis include feelings of sickness or weakness, weight loss, fever, and night sweats. The symptoms of TB disease of the lungs also include coughing, chest pain, and the coughing up of blood. Symptoms of TB disease in other parts of the body depend on the area affected.

How Am I Tested for TB?

The tuberculin skin test may be used to find out if you are infected with TB bacteria. A tuberculin skin test may be done as part of a physical examination prior to starting school or a new job. The test is performed on the patient’s skin by injecting a purified protein derivative (PPD) solution just under the skin. You can get a skin test at the health department or at your doctor’s office. A health care worker will inject a small amount of testing fluid called tuberculin just under the skin on the lower part of your arm. After 2 or 3 days, you must return to have your skin test read by the health care worker. You may have a swelling where the tuberculin was injected. The health care worker will measure this swelling and tell you if your reaction to the test is positive or negative. A negative result means you probably do not have the tuberculosis bacteria in your body. A positive reaction usually means that you have been infected by someone with active TB disease. A positive reaction does not tell whether the person has progressed to TB disease or has latent TB infection. Latent TB infection can be determined with a QuantiFERON blood draw. Other tests, such as a chest x-ray and a sample of sputum, may be needed to see whether the person has TB disease.

What is the Difference Between Latent TB Infection and TB Disease?

People with latent TB infection have TB germs in their bodies, but they are not sick because the germs are not active. These people do not have symptoms of TB disease, and they cannot spread the germs to others. However, they may develop TB disease in the future. They are often prescribed treatment to prevent them from developing TB disease.

People with TB disease are sick from TB germs that are active, meaning that they are multiplying and destroying tissue in their body. They usually have symptoms of TB disease. People with TB disease of the lungs or throat are capable of spreading germs to others and must have medical attention.

What is the Treatment for TB?

People with TB disease or active tuberculosis require medical attention. Hospitalization or at home isolation, not attending school or work, are required while the person remains contagious. Active TB is usually treated with several medications, Isoniazid, Rifampin, Pyrazinamide, and Ethambutol, to kill the bacteria. The medicine must be taken as directed by your doctor. A person is considered non-contagious after they have three negative smears from the sputum, been on treatment for at least two weeks, and are clinically improving.

People with latent TB infection are treated with a medication therapy, usually Isoniazid or INH for nine months. INH kills the TB bacteria that are in the body.
More information about tuberculosis is available through the Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention website at
www.cdc.gov/tb

What is Latent Tuberculosis Infection?

What is latent TB infection?

In most people who breathe in TB bacteria and become infected, the body is able to fight the bacteria to stop them from growing. The bacteria become inactive, but they remain alive in the body and can become active later. This is called latent TB infection. People with latent TB infection

  • Have no symptoms
  • Don’t feel sick
  • Can’t spread TB to others
  • Usually have a positive skin test reaction
  • Can develop TB disease later in life if they do not receive treatment for latent TB infection

Many people who have latent TB infection never develop TB disease. In these people, the TB bacteria remain inactive for a lifetime without causing disease. But in other people, especially people who have weak immune systems, the bacteria become active and cause TB disease or also known as active tuberculosis.

What is the TB Skin Test?

The TB skin test tells you if the tuberculosis bacteria are in your body. Your health care professional places a small amount of solution under the skin with a needle to see if a reaction occurs.

How Do I Get My TB Test Results?

Within 2-3 days after the test, you’ll be asked to return to your health care professional. Be sure to keep this appointment. Your test results will be evaluated during this visit. In some cases, a second test may be done to confirm results.

What do the Test Results Mean?

No reaction or negative results mean you probably don’t have the tuberculosis bacteria in your body

A reaction or positive results, with the induration or bump measured in millimeters, mean you may have been infected with the tuberculosis bacteria. This doesn’t necessarily mean you have TB disease (or active tuberculosis)–you may have TB infection (LTBI). More tests, such as chest x-rays, are needed to find out if you have TB disease.

Whether you have TB disease or infection, you must see a health care professional for evaluation and treatment.

What is the Medication for TB infection (LTBI)?

The medication usually used for the treatment of latent TB infection is a drug called Isoniazid or INH. INH kills the TB bacteria in the body. If you take your medicine as prescribed, treatment for latent TB infection will keep you from ever developing TB disease.

Meningitis on Campus

Certain college students are at increased risk for meningococcal disease, a potentially fatal bacterial infection commonly referred to as meningitis.

In fact, freshmen living in dorms or residence halls are found to have a sixfold increased risk for the disease. A U.S. health advisory panel recommends that college students, particularly freshmen living in dorms, learn more about meningitis and vaccination.

What is meningococcal meningitis?

Meningitis is rare. But when it strikes, this potentially fatal bacterial disease can lead to swelling of fluid surrounding the brain and spinal column as well as severe and permanent disabilities, such as hearing loss, brain damage, seizures, limb amputation and even death.

How is it spread?

Meningococcal meningitis is spread through the air via respiratory secretions or close contact with an infected person. This can include coughing, sneezing, kissing or sharing items like utensils, cigarettes and drinking glasses.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of meningococcal meningitis often resemble the flu and can include high fever, severe headache, stiff neck, rash, nausea, vomiting, lethargy and confusion.

Who is at risk?

Certain college students, particularly freshmen who live in dor­mitories or residence halls, have been found to have an increased risk for meningococcal meningitis. Other undergraduates can also consider vaccination to reduce their risk for the disease.

Can meningitis be prevented?

Yes. A safe and effective vaccine is available to protect against four of the five most common strains of the disease. The vaccine provides protection for approximately three to five years. As with any vaccine, vaccination against meningitis may not protect 100 percent of all susceptible individuals.

For more information:

To learn more about meningitis and the vaccine, visit your local health care provider.  You may also visit the websites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo, and the American College Health Association, www.acha.org.

Requirement:

All Cottey College students are required to receive the meningococcal vaccination before arrival on campus.  Please note, the meningococcal vaccination is not available at Cottey College Health Services.